Be a Responsible Chorister

 You should also know that your main responsibility as a chorister is to communicate to an audience or congregation through singing a well-defined music, and then any other positive feature can follow.

Are you a chorister? If you are a chorister or aspire to be a chorister, be a responsible one. Chorister is a derived term of choir and the difference between chorister and choir is that chorister is a singer in a choir while choir is a singing group: group of people who sing together; company of people who are trained to sing together.

Know clearly that singing is the first priority of a chorister. Music is the organisation of sounds that are pleasant to the hearing. Therefore each member of a choir should be well organised to form a group that will sing or perform a music or songs that is well organised well. Being a member of a choir means the opportunity or ability to be able to sing high standard choral music to people in a well delivery manner.


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You should also know that your main responsibility as a chorister is to communicate to an audience or congregation through singing a well-defined music, and then any other positive feature can follow. Know that if you fail in your main responsibility, then you have deviated from your purpose as a chorister. If you have joined the choir because your friend(s) is/are in the choir or the elegance of the robe, then you need to redefine your intention and purpose of being there.

Responsible Chorister

In a nutshell, a potential choristers need to be able to sing well to pitch (his/her notes should be in pitch with the piano or organ) and be interested in developing his/her musical ability. Enjoyment of singing and a willingness to work hard are far more important than experience and social aspect of the choir.

Also, you should endeavour to acquire valuable skills that include: team-work, self-discipline, self-confidence, taking responsibility and the ability to concentrate on a task. These will be of good benefit to a chorister that possess them in his/her choir and outside the choir.

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Good choristers should understand that what they are doing matters to others; people come to watch and listen to them singing and demonstrate their appreciation. The pride that you take in this is evident, as are the positive effects on your feelings of self-worth and blessing of God in your life.

 Responsible Chorister

Part of your responsibility as a good chorister is to stay connected to your choir and be committed. Commitment to the choir can be shown in many ways (not least turning up on time!). But for most choristers, the most important commitment is simply to turn up every week. Turning up every week and time is good but not the best if the impact of attending practice and rehearsal are not showing in the way you sound when you sing.

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However, there are many people who have the whole time but show up only once or twice. Again, this demonstrates a lack of respect for both the choir and its members. Also it implies that the work that they do each week rehearsing and learning songs is not that valuable and it’s possible to just turn up for the concert or other musical events.

You have to take responsibility to attend regularly (and on time), turn up every week and stay focus during the practice and rehearsal, to know your part, to stay aware of rehearsal schedules, to listen to the director’s instructions, and so on.

Chorister are not extraordinary, but they do extraordinary things, and I believe the key to this behaviour lies in the sense of responsibility they feel for their work.


I always welcome your feedback and wisdom (it can get lonely at this side of the keyboard!).
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